Dear Cloth Diapering Newbie On A Budget,

Budget Friendly CD

A few weeks ago, I wrote an article about my preferences for cloth diapering, which caused me to go through my entire stash and add up my total cloth diapering costs. Looking at my expenses in cloth diapering really made me consider things I would change with the knowledge I’ve gained in the last year and a half, as well as cheaper ways to create a complete stash for my two kids. Certainly, I have spent a fair amount of money on some very fancy diapers that, actually, were totally unnecessary, but all that searching has given me a lot of valuable information on what does work.

These are the adjustments that I would make now. (I am including the price of a new diaper as well as gently used prices which I list in italics, if a major retailer sells the item in that condition.)

Daytime Cloth Diapering Stash

  • 24 small Cloth-eez prefolds [$29 per dozen]
  • 12 large Cloth-eez prefolds [$40 per dozen]
  • 4 size 1 Thirsties Duo Wrap, in Aplix hook and loop [$12.75/$10.25 ea]
  • 6 size 2 Thirsties Duo Wrap, in Aplix hook and loop [12.75/10.25 ea]
  • 1 size 1 Snappi [$3.95]
  • 8-10 Kawaii One Size pocket diapers (to use outside the home) [$9.95/$8.50]

Nighttime Diapering Stash

  • 3 large Cloth-eez fitted diaper [$10.95 ea]
  • 3 medium Cloth-eez fitted diaper [$9.50 ea]
  • 5 Thirsties Duo hemp/cotton prefolds [$7.95 ea]
  • 3-5 medium fleece soakers [$7 ea]
  • 3-5 large fleece soakers [$9 ea]
  • 3-5 extra large fleece soakers [$10.50 ea]
  • 3 Green Mountain Diapers night stay-dry doubler [$8.50 ea]
  • 5 Kawaii Goodnight Heavy Wetter pocket diapers for toddler overnight/naptime diapering [$7.75 ea]

I averaged my actual stash cost at about $750, but with these adjustments I could be cloth diapering two children for just under $500. That may seem like quite a large number up front, but you can spread out the cost over several months, making it a manageable sum. If you don’t have to work hard at convincing loved ones of your cloth diapering intention, you may receive quite a few of these items as gifts as well. And, if you’re cloth diapering one child, you won’t even need all of those items for the first year. So, $400 in the first year. Max.

Buy yourself a well deserved margarita for saving so much. Unless you’re pregnant, in which case, go buy some chocolate.

If you are willing to bargain hunt, the price can drop even lower. Here are some of my suggestions for cloth diapering as cheaply as possible with quality items:

  1. Join a local Buy/Sell/Trade Cloth Diapering Group on Facebook. I like local because you can touch, feel, check and smell diapers before purchasing.
  2. Visit or call local baby consignment stores to see if they have any CDs in stock.
  3. Buy fleece soakers, rather than wool on Etsy. If you’re handy, and you’re looking for something to do before baby arrives, make your own. These can be thrown in with your regular wash, making them a super easy alternative to wool. Even if your child wears disposables, particularly at night, a fleece cover will help control leakage. (Because everything leaks.)
  4. Visit major websites frequently for sales. Items may be marked down tremendously following the release of new and updated versions of diapers. In fact, I’ve purchased all of my pocket diapers during transitions like this for about 10% off the regular price.
  5. Several major websites with trial programs also sell Gently Used versions of all the trial diapers. These typically remain in excellent condition and are, in all actuality, only slightly used. Plus, most of these companies have a return policy if you’re not satisfied.
  6. Find friends who are ready to de-stash and make an offer on the lot. They’ll be so grateful to have the entire thing off their hands.
  7. Sell or consign your diapers when you are done to keep costs down in the long run.

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